Buying a House With No Money At All! 100% Financing Options Made Simple

“NO MONEY DOWN!” “100% FINANCING!” “103% FINANCING”

Buyers love seeing and hearing those words. And why wouldn’t they? First-time buyers make up 40 percent of the home buying market. This is nearly half of all homes sold.

Consider this. There were just over seven million homes sold in 2005, not including new construction homes. This means that nearly THREE MILLION buyers bought their first home last year.

Marketing to this segment, if you are a real estate agent, is an absolute must! Of these first-time homebuyers more than four out of every 10 bought this home with no money down.

On average, first-time homebuyers put down less than 2%. Around 10 years ago, the average first-time homebuyer put down a little more than 10%.

I would say that nearly seven out of every 10 loans I do has 100% financing and it’s not just first-time homebuyers. However, most potential first-time buyers don’t even realize this option is available to them and that’s why this newsletter will focus on them.

The real estate market flourished over the last few years in large part to 100% financing for first-time homebuyers. Suddenly, buying a home is possible for nearly everyone. More first-time buyers have been able to enter the marketplace than ever before. Banks have become more liberal and lending standards have loosened. There are many, many ways to get 100% financing.

You can get 100% conventional financing with credit scores as low as 620 and a fairly recent bankruptcy.

You may be able to get a government loan with an even lower credit score. 100% financing is available for nearly every borrower. You can even buy a $2,000,000 home with no money down today. That’s two MILLION, not a typo at $200,000. Amazing, but true.

Many potential first-time homebuyers never think of buying a house because they don’t believe they have enough money for the down payment.

They’ve been told through the years that they need a 10-20% down payment to buy a home. Obviously, this simply isn’t true.

Let’s look at most of the 100% financing options:

1) 100% No Down Payment Programs.

These programs require the buyer to pay ordinary closing costs. These programs come in all varieties from 2, 3, 5, 7, and 10 year adjustable rate mortgages to 30 year fixed mortgages. All are usually available as interest-only too.

PROGRAM HIGHLIGHTS AND HOW DO I QUALIFY FOR THIS?

o 2.5%-3.5% of the total loan amount in cash required to pay closing costs and two month’s of your new loan payment in the bank for reserves.

o Stated income, stated assets and even No Doc is an option with decent credit.

o Plan on having a mid credit score of at least 660 if you cannot fully disclose your income to qualify.

o If you can fully disclose your income to qualify, your mid credit score can sometimes be as low as 580.

o These loans are designed for people who have some money for closing costs. You can qualify for this with credit scores as low as 580.

This is the most popular 100% financing option on my team.

2) 100% No Down Payment and Seller Pays Your Closing Costs.

The exact same loan program as #1, with all of the same loan program options above, but with a different twist. The seller pays all of the 2.5%-3.5% in closing costs. This is the way to go if your buyer has no money at all but fairly decent credit.

PROGRAM HIGHLIGHTS AND HOW DO I QUALIFY FOR THIS?

o The seller pays the 2.5%-3.5% of the total loan amount to pay closing costs.

o You are still usually required to show two month’s of your new loan payment in the bank for reserves.

o Stated income, stated assets and even No Doc is an option with decent credit.

o Plan on having a mid-score of at least 660 if you cannot go fully disclose your income to qualify.

o 580 mid credit score is usually the minimum required on full doc loans but plan on a much higher interest rate.

o These loans are designed for people who have no money for closing costs.

Nearly every loan program out there today allows for the seller to pay your closing costs. This means no money out of your pocket.

If you don’t have the necessary reserves or you don’t have the ability to get them, it is not a big deal, and you should still be able to get the loan. However, it’s important to notify your preferred lender of this immediately as this could change the availability of the loan program and likely your interest rate.

3) 103% Loan With No Down Payment, Little or No Closing Costs.

Maybe your seller refuses to pay for closing costs and your buyer has no money to close. Then 103% loan programs may be the way to go. This means the lender finances the closing costs as well. The requirements on this program are stricter and the options fewer.

PROGRAM HIGHLIGHTS AND HOW DO I QUALIFY FOR THIS?

o The lender pays the 2.5%-3.5% of the total loan amount to pay closing costs and ties this into your loan.

o You still may be required to show two month’s of your new loan payment in the bank for reserves.

o Stated income, stated assets and even No Doc is NOT usually an option regardless of your credit.

o Plan on having a mid-score of at least 620.

o These loans are designed for people who have no money for closing costs and the seller refuses to chip in.

The interest rates on these programs are higher and the program selection is more limited. If possible, it’s a better move to go for #1 or #2.

4) VA Loans

If you are a Veteran, VA loans require no money down and the seller can pay your closing costs. The rates are very good and the credit requirements are not very high.

PROGRAM HIGHLIGHTS AND HOW DO I QUALIFY FOR THIS?

o Must be a veteran in active duty, or honorably discharged.

o The seller usually pays the 2.5%-3.5% of the total loan amount to pay closing costs but the Veteran can pay too.

o Must fully disclose your income to qualify. You cannot go stated income or No Doc.

o You will not be required to show two month’s of your new loan payment in the bank for reserves.

o Stated income, stated assets and even No Doc is NOT an option regardless of your credit.

o Plan on having mid-score of at least 560 – 580 although there is no formal guideline on this.

o These loans are designed for Veterans only.

5) FHA Loans

This isn’t really a “No Money Down” option, however many first-time homebuyers have found that the FHA loan is one of the best alternatives when they don’t have much money to put down.

With an FHA loan, you could put down as little as 3%. FHA loans are easier to qualify for. If your credit is less-than-perfect, the rates on an FHA loan are usually far better than the sub-prime alternative that you may be facing. For example, if you have a 580 mid-credit score, your options may be FHA or a sub-prime loan. FHA would probably be cheaper for you.

Now, 3% may seem like a lot to come up with, but many people find that when they put their minds to it, it’s not that difficult. FHA allows this 3% to be gifted to you by a family member, employer, or even a charitable organizatio

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Mortgages and Loans: Islamic Finance Avoids Interest.

Two million Muslims in the UK face an ethical dilemma if they want a mortgage or a loan. Conventional mortgages and loans all require the payment of interest and “riba” as interest is called under Islamic law, is forbidden by the Koran.

British financial institutions are increasingly catering for Muslims’ specialist needs through a number of alternative arrangements that respects the teachings of the Koran. Here are just two of them:

Ijara with diminishing Musharaka – the mortgage alternative.

Ijara with diminishing Musharaka is an Islamic alternative to a conventional UK mortgage and has been adopted by several British banks and building societies.

In essence, Musharaka means partnership. Under this Islamic financial concept, the bank buys the house and legally becomes its owner. Then throughout the pre-agreed period, say 25 years, a monthly payment is made. Each monthly payment includes a charge for rent and a charge that buys a small proportion of the house itself. It’s form of variable shared equity plan with the proportion of the house being owned by the purchaser, steadily increasing as payments are made. Once the final payment has been made, the house is owned outright. Ijara

Here you tell the bank or financial institution what you want, for example a car, and they buy it. In return for a monthly payment that covers the cost of the bank’s capital, the bank then allows you to use the asset for an agreed period. In reality, it’s a form of leasing

Islamic finance is not widely available in the UK – so where can find it? Here are three suggestions:

Over the last few years Lloyds TSB has introduced Islamic products to 33 of its branches. Their spokesperson says, “It’s important for our customers to see that we are following the right procedures. We have a panel of four Islamic scholars who over-see the products. They offer guidance on Islamic law and audit the products”.

Another high street bank, HSBC, is developing a special range of Islamic products under the Amanah brand name. This range includes home finance plans, home insurance, commercial finance, and various current accounts and pensions. Hussam Sultan, the Amanah product manager says, “As a bank, we are not here to moralise or tell our customers that Amanah finance is the way to please Allah. We’re just here to provide them with a choice”.

The Islamic Bank of Britain has three branches in London, two in Birmingham and one each in Leicester and Manchester. They’re the only British bank specifically providing for Muslim customers and claim to be halal throughout their operations. All their financial products are approved by their Sharia’a Supervisory Committee – all Muslim scholars who are experts in all aspects of Islamic finance.

For your interest we show below, definitions of some words used widely in connection with Islamic finance.

A Glossary of selected Islamic words used in finance.

Amanah: Means trustworthiness, with associated aspects of faithfulness and honesty. As a central supplementary meaning, amanah also describes a business deal where one party keeps another’s funds or property in trust. This actually the most widely used and understood application of the term, having a long history of use in Islamic commercial law. It can also be used to describe different financial activities such as deposit taking, custody or goods on consignment.

Arbun: Means a down payment. It’s a non-refundable deposit paid to the seller by the buyer upon agreeing a sale contract together with an undertaking that the sale contract will be completed during a prearranged period.

Gharar: This means uncertainty. It’s one of three essential prohibitions in Islamic finance (the others being riba and maysir). Gharar is a sophisticated concept that encompasses certain types of uncertainty or contingency in a contract. The prohibition on gharar is often used as the grounds for criticism of conventional financial practices such as speculation, derivatives and short selling contracts.

Islamic financial services / Islamic banking / Islamic finance : Means financial services that meet the specific requirements of Islamic law or Shariah. Whilst designed to meet specific Muslim religious requirements, Islamic banking is not restricted to Muslims. Both the customers and the service providers can be non-Muslim as well as Muslim.

Ijara: Means an Islamic leasing agreement. Ijarah permits the financial institution to earn a profit by charging leasing rentals instead of lending money and earning interest. The ijarah concept is extended to hire and purchase agreements by Ijarah wa iqtinah.

Maysir: Means gambling. It’s another of three fundamental prohibitions in Islamic finance (the other two being riba and gharar). The prohibition of maysir is often used as the basis for criticism of standard financial practices such as conventional insurance, speculation and derivative contracts.

Mudarabah: A Mudarabah is a form of Investment partnership. Here, capital is provided by the investor (the Rab ul Mal) to another party (the Mudarib) in order to undertake a business or investment activity. Profits are then shared according to pre-arranged proportions but any loss on the investment is born exclusively by the investor and the mudarib then loses the expected income share.

Mudarib: The mudarib is the investment manager or entrepreneur in a mudarabah (see above). It is this managers responsibility to invest the investor’s money in a project or portfolio in exchange for a share of the profits. A mudarabah is essentially similar to a diversified pool of assets held in a conventional Discretionary Managed Investment Portfolio.

Murabaha: means purchase and resale. As opposed to lending money, the capital provider purchases the required asset or product (for which a loan would otherwise have been taken out) from a third party. The asset is then resold at a higher price to the capital user. By paying this higher price by instalments, the capital user effectively gets credit without paying interest. (Also see tawarruq the opposite of murabaha.)

Musharaka: This means profit and loss sharing. It’s a partnership where the profits are shared in pre-arranged proportions and any losses are shared in proportion to each partners’ capital or investment. In Musharakah, all the partners to the commercial undertaking contribute funds and have the right, but without the obligation, to exercise executive powers in that undertaking. It’s a similar concept to a conventional partnership and the holding of voting stock in a limited company. Musharakah is regarded as the purest form of Islamic financing.

Riba: This means interest. The legal concept extends beyond interest, but in simple terms, riba covers any return of money on money. It does not matter whether the interest is floating or floating, simple or compounded, or what the rate is. Riba is strictly prohibited under Islamic law..

Shariah: This is the Islamic law as disclosed in the Quran and through the example of Prophet Muhammad (PBUH). A Shariah product must meet all the requirements of Islamic law. To facilitate this, a Shariah board is usually appointed. This board or committee is usually comprised of Islamic scholars available to the organisation for guidance and supervision for the development of Shariah compliant products.

Shariah adviser: Means an independent professional, usually a classically trained Islamic legal scholar, appointed to advise an Islamic financial organisation on the compliance of its products and services with Islamic law, the Shariah. While some organisations consult individual Shariah advisers, most establish a committee of Shariah advisers (often known as a Shariah committee or Shariah board).

Shariah compliant: Means the activity that ensures that the requirements of the Shariah, or Islamic law are observed. The term is often used in the Islamic banking industry as a synonym for “Islamic”- for example, Shariah compliant financing or Shariah compliant investment.

Sukuk: This has similar characteristics to a conventional bond. The difference is that that they are asset backed and a sukuk represents the proportionate beneficial ownership in the underlying asset. The asset is then leased to the client to yield the profit on the sukuk.

Takaful: This is Islamic insurance. Takaful plans are designed to avoid the characteristics of conventional insurance (i.e. interest and gambling) that are so problematical for Muslims. They structure the arrangement as a charitable collective pool of funds based on the comcept of mutual assistance.

Tawarruq: When used in personal finance, a customer with a cash requirement buys something on credit on a deferred payment basis. That customer then immediately resells the item for cash to a third party. The customer thereby obtains cash without taking an interest-based loan. Tawarruq is the opposite to murabahah.

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Why Young Adults Need to Learn About Personal Finance in School

Children are sent to school for the purpose of learning and developing talents and skills that will prepare them for future life in the real world. While it is true that they are taught grammar, math, Biology, languages, and skills like baking and other practical arts, they are usually found lacking in the subject of personal finance.

To manage your own personal finances is basic and essential when you want to become self-reliant and when you want to put your life in order and start a home of your own. To have the fundamental understanding of personal finance means that you are better prepared to face life ahead of you. It is very common, for instance, how young couples get on with their lives together with high hopes for the future, only to be met with disappointment and soon find themselves entangled in debt. This situation is just a result of not learning the essentials of personal finance.

Without gaining these basic skills soon enough, they may find themselves sinking deeper into debt. Then they start to lose whatever assets they had acquired, their homes, and possibly threaten their relationships. Not knowing what would happen if you spend more than you earn, or why is it important to save even just a small portion of your earning, or why is it necessary to be cautious when using credit, is a sure reason for falling into the mire of debt. If you try to handle your own household without basic learning, the future would be bleak and failure is not far ahead.

This is the reason why young people in high school should be taught these primary tenets. They need to acquire these skills early on in order to be ready when they are on their own, whether in going to the university, in having a job, or even living at home.

Now, therefore, is the perfect time for them to learn how to live within a budget, to not spend more than what they earn, and to save, before they face real life and have regrets later on. The worst thing they can do for themselves to build up a ton of debt, have bad credit and not be able to make those important life purchases down the road, like a home or a car.

Being equipped with the fundamental knowledge in personal finances will mean a world of difference in the future for high school children.

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The Concept Of Finance In Different Contexts

The word finance has the sane connotations wherever it is used. It means liquid funds or cash reserves to be utilized for various purposes. For a very poor man, finance has only one meaning and that is to be able to generate enough to get him two meals a day. For a common man, it means to be able to pay off all his loan installments, his kids school fees, and his and his wife’s requirements depending upon their social circle.

For a small shop owner, the word finance means the funds he needs for his next purchase for the big occasions like Christmas and New Year. To an industrialist, the same word means his ability to complete the ongoing projects and to sign off new contracts with other companies. For a country, finance means reserves to be spent on the development of infrastructure, imports, healthcare, research and development agriculture and all other essential sectors. But in all situations, the essence of the word remains the same. It’s only the degree and magnitude that change.

Finance in itself is a big subject that is taught in business schools according to scientific rules. These finance schools produce youngsters trained in the principles of finance that go on to hold the reigns in big multinational companies. People having knowledge of sound principles of finance make the financial policies of the companies and they are accountable if any financial irregularities are found in the balance sheets or the accounts of any company.

Banks and other financial institutions are the backbone of any economy and they serve the financial needs of the people by making available loans and other mortgages to let them carry on with their projects like buying a car, electronics, home or any other thing. Banks even provide finances to let a person complete his higher education.

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What Does Subject-To Financing Mean to Real Estate Investors?

Acquiring real estate “Subject To” is an investment strategy that allows investors to acquire a property with little or no money out of pocket by leaving the seller’s existing mortgage in place. More simply, the investor does not have to get a loan through a bank or hard money lender to buy the property because they have purchased the property “subject to” the existing loan or loans. Put another way, “subject to” is a way to control a property by having the seller of that property continue to hold their bank financing in their name, but give the interest, benefits, and responsibility of the property to the investor. Because the seller’s name remains on the loan they will still remain liable for the payments if they were not made by the buyer.

Subject To Investing | Common Questions

Could the lender call the loan due if the property is sold subject-to?

Technically yes, but practically no. Whenever a home is sold, the underlying lender technically has the right to “call the loan due”. This is known as the “due on sale clause.” Almost all home loans that are less than 25 years old will have a “due on sale clause.” That being said, we have never seen a case in which a lender actually calls a loan in which the loan payments are being made in a timely manner. Banks are in the business of loaning money and collecting money, not in the business of managing property. Additionally, the lender would have to do their due diligence in order to even know that a sale took place, and why would they do that on a well performing loan? Finally, there are some strategies that investors use to further disguise a subject to sale, however, it is debatable whether these strategies are necessary.

Can a property be sold subject to when payments have been missed?

Yes, in some cases if there is a substantial amount of equity in the home, an investor or buyer may be willing to make up the back payments and buy the property subject to.
How will selling subject to affect the seller’s credit?

Most of the time there will be no affect on the seller’s credit in a subject to deal. However, if the seller has missed payments in the past and then an investor or buyer makes up those missed payments and pays on time from that moment on, it can actually improve the seller’s credit score. On the flip side, if the seller were to sell their home subject to the existing financing to a buyer that is not able to make the payments on time, the seller’s credit could then be damaged.

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